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Not Only For Nerds
jacobsoboroff:

Check out this really awesome interactive data visualization of the world’s largest data breaches, hacks and leaks.
H/T Jake Brewer.

jacobsoboroff:

Check out this really awesome interactive data visualization of the world’s largest data breaches, hacks and leaks.

H/T Jake Brewer.

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trendd:

Genius.

"Tile finds whatever you’ve lost, if you’ve stuck one of the little white Tile squares to it. Each Tile pairs with an iOS app, so when the item goes missing, you can use your Apple device to track it down. But that’s just the beginning. The company is planning to build a community of users, any of whom could track down your item if it goes missing in public."

(via Incredible Tiny Device Finds Your Keys, Busts Car Thieves and Saves the Universe | Adweek)

(Source: youtube.com)

thisistheverge:

Disney developing emotive 3D-printed eyes for robots
Disney Research has detailed a new technology that will allow robots to have expressive eyes. Based on the 3D printing tech Disney announced last year, Papillon uses bundles of printed optical fibers to guide light. By hooking the output end of the bundle up to a robot’s eye, researchers were able to project an image from the receiving end of the bundle and have it appear at the other end. 

thisistheverge:

Disney developing emotive 3D-printed eyes for robots

Disney Research has detailed a new technology that will allow robots to have expressive eyes. Based on the 3D printing tech Disney announced last year, Papillon uses bundles of printed optical fibers to guide light. By hooking the output end of the bundle up to a robot’s eye, researchers were able to project an image from the receiving end of the bundle and have it appear at the other end. 

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springwise:

Handheld sensor detects stress and teaches users to control it
Gamification is known to be effective in encouraging positive habits when it comes to health, as devices such as the T-Haler have demonstrated. Having recently reached its funding target on Kickstarter, the PIP is a device that senses stress when held in the hand and can be used to control video game characters that teach users how to manage their anxiety. READ MORE…

springwise:

Handheld sensor detects stress and teaches users to control it

Gamification is known to be effective in encouraging positive habits when it comes to health, as devices such as the T-Haler have demonstrated. Having recently reached its funding target on Kickstarter, the PIP is a device that senses stress when held in the hand and can be used to control video game characters that teach users how to manage their anxiety. READ MORE…

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techspotlight:

(via Google Now Rolling Out Invitations for Google Glass)
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threedeeprinting:

A 3D Printer with an Undo Button? It’s possible.

"A group of grad students at the Southern California Institute of Architecture in Los Angeles have harnessed the ability to fix the past when it comes to 3-D printing. Traditional 3-D printers create objects by incrementally printing thousands of 2-D layers, which makes going back to fix things impossible. That’s why Brian Harms, the lead designer of theSuspended Dispositions project, and his team created a freeform printer that injects ultraviolet-curable liquid resin into a tank of gel using a needle-thin print head mounted on a robotic arm. The resin stays in liquid form until it comes into contact with UV light, which means designers can retrace missteps, manually or robotically, and fix potential design flaws. It’s essentially like pressing an “undo” button.”

 

(via Fast Co.Labs- http://www.fastcolabs.com/3014851/what-if-3-d-printers-had-an-undo-button)

(Source: vimeo.com)

8bitfuture:

GPS ‘hack’ throws $80M superyacht off course.
A University of Texas team has shown how a relatively low cost small software radio device can be used to trick GPS receivers into believing false signals. Because all GPS signals are sent to Earth without any authentication or encryption, the team was able to send a false signal which was perfectly aligned with what the receiving unit would have been expecting.
In this case the signal was sent from on board the yacht with permission from the captain, however the team says it could easily be used maliciously:

What we did was out in the open, it was against a live vehicle, a vessel—an $80 million superyacht, controlling it with a $2,000 box,” he told Ars. “This is unprecedented. This has never been shown in this kind of demonstration. That’s what so sinister about the attack that we did. There were no alarms on the bridge. The GPS receiver showed a strong signal the whole time. You just need to have approximate line of sight visibility. Let’s say you had an unmanned drone, you could do it from 20 to 30 kilometers away or on the ocean you could do two to three kilometers.”

8bitfuture:

GPS ‘hack’ throws $80M superyacht off course.

A University of Texas team has shown how a relatively low cost small software radio device can be used to trick GPS receivers into believing false signals. Because all GPS signals are sent to Earth without any authentication or encryption, the team was able to send a false signal which was perfectly aligned with what the receiving unit would have been expecting.

In this case the signal was sent from on board the yacht with permission from the captain, however the team says it could easily be used maliciously:

What we did was out in the open, it was against a live vehicle, a vessel—an $80 million superyacht, controlling it with a $2,000 box,” he told Ars. “This is unprecedented. This has never been shown in this kind of demonstration. That’s what so sinister about the attack that we did. There were no alarms on the bridge. The GPS receiver showed a strong signal the whole time. You just need to have approximate line of sight visibility. Let’s say you had an unmanned drone, you could do it from 20 to 30 kilometers away or on the ocean you could do two to three kilometers.”

(Source: Ars Technica, via 8bitfuture)

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yahoo:

By Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo!

Photos tell the stories — stories we’re inspired to relive, share with our friends, or capture simply to express ourselves. Collecting these moments is a part of our everyday. Since 2005, Flickr has become synonymous with inspiring imagery. Today, we’re thrilled…

ajc:

Try, try and fail again

With the impending demise of Google Reader, and with it, Starred Items, which is my ToDo inbox, I made another attempt to love Evernote. This, like all previous attempts, failed. Here’s why.

ajc:

Try, try and fail again

With the impending demise of Google Reader, and with it, Starred Items, which is my ToDo inbox, I made another attempt to love Evernote. This, like all previous attempts, failed. Here’s why.

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(Source: nickcobb)

joshbyard:

Researchers Build Complex 3D Nano Structures Out of DNA By Manipulating How Strands Join

“We were amazed that it worked!” said Yan. “Once we saw that it actually worked, it was relatively easy to implement new designs. Now it seems easy in hindsight. If your mindset is limited by the conventional rules, it’s really hard to take the next step. Once you take that step, it becomes so obvious.”
The DNA Gridiron designs are programmed into a viral DNA, where a spaghetti-shaped single strand of DNA is spit out and folded together with the help of small ‘staple’ strands of DNA that help mold the final DNA structure. In a test tube, the mixture is heated, then rapidly cooled, and everything self-assembles and molds into the final shape once cooled.
Next, using sophisticated AFM and TEM imaging technology, they are able to examine the shapes and sizes of the final products and determine that they had formed correctly.
This approach has allowed them to build multilayered, 3-D structures and curved objects for new applications. “Most of our research team is now devoted toward finding new applications for this basic toolkit we are making,” said Yan. “There is still a long way to go and a lot of new ideas to explore. We just need to keep talking to biologists, physicists and engineers to understand and meet their needs.”

(via DNA made into Complex 2D and 3D DNA nanostructures made from DNA wireframe meshes using new adaptable junctions)

joshbyard:

Researchers Build Complex 3D Nano Structures Out of DNA By Manipulating How Strands Join

“We were amazed that it worked!” said Yan. “Once we saw that it actually worked, it was relatively easy to implement new designs. Now it seems easy in hindsight. If your mindset is limited by the conventional rules, it’s really hard to take the next step. Once you take that step, it becomes so obvious.”

The DNA Gridiron designs are programmed into a viral DNA, where a spaghetti-shaped single strand of DNA is spit out and folded together with the help of small ‘staple’ strands of DNA that help mold the final DNA structure. In a test tube, the mixture is heated, then rapidly cooled, and everything self-assembles and molds into the final shape once cooled.

Next, using sophisticated AFM and TEM imaging technology, they are able to examine the shapes and sizes of the final products and determine that they had formed correctly.

This approach has allowed them to build multilayered, 3-D structures and curved objects for new applications. “Most of our research team is now devoted toward finding new applications for this basic toolkit we are making,” said Yan. “There is still a long way to go and a lot of new ideas to explore. We just need to keep talking to biologists, physicists and engineers to understand and meet their needs.”

(via DNA made into Complex 2D and 3D DNA nanostructures made from DNA wireframe meshes using new adaptable junctions)

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ramialkarmi:

If you were asked to name the top three events in the history of computer technology (or the history of what came to be known as the IT industry), which ones would you choose? Here’s my very short list:

http://twt.lu/145qk0z

(Source: snpjudgements)

ramialkarmi:

The Department of the Navy Chief Information Officer (DON) recently sent out the memo, “Department of the Navy Approach to Cloud Computing .” The memo states that to increase efficiency and achieve necessary cost savings, the department is moving forward to employ capable cloud computing solutions…